Wednesday, May 18, 2016

The Ark of Music - Stumpjumper review


"As a whole, Stumpjumper is raw and authentic, a piece of real music that real music lovers of any genre can appreciate. But there’s more here…this album (and all of Parr’s work for that matter) possesses an intangible value. Though difficult to identify, it has something to do with the fact that Mr. Parr dares to produce and inject truth and meaning into a culture that, currently, seems to turn arrogantly away from anything that causes one to think or feel sincerely. His music, scarred and weathered, is completely and totally vulnerable. And, in an age of cynicism and entitlement, Charlie’s vulnerability is not only rare, it is essential."

Read the full review at The Ark of Music.

UK & Ireland Tour - August 2016


Tiny Farm Duluth Podcast


"Charlie Parr strolled into the neighborhood yesterday—barefoot, even though it was cold and damp. We had a nice conversation about the hardships and joys of life on the road, dropping out of school, and how he slowly got into making music as a vocation."

Listen to Eddy Gilmore's conversation with Charlie at Tiny Farm Duluth.

All My Friends Are in Bar Bands Podcast



"Brian Wilson once said that he just wasn't made for these times. Imagine, then, how Charlie Parr feels - he's essentially the greatest 20s bluesman to have been born some 40 years after the fact. He might feel like he's from a different plane of existence entirely, but Parr's dozen-plus albums all immediately feel like home in their own unique way. Before a show at the Brass Monkey in Cronulla, Charlie tells all about life on the southbank and houses filled with music. He also shares what is probably one of the best stories ever told on this podcast toward the end."

Blues for the Caribou River Wayside



This was recorded at Sacred Heart in Duluth one evening, all the tracks are first takes, there's no one there but me in this huge old church. I was using certain songs as a kind of jumping off point for improvisations, and for the most part I think I failed at bringing the songs to a place where they count as inspired improvisations. The "Ore Dock" thing is also a failed attempt at doing experimental guitar sounds, inspired by Bill Orcutt, Jack Rose, Alan Sparhawk etc. The small label that wanted to release it said it was too short but I didn't want to add anything to it, and so we left it behind. I got back to the idea with "Hollandale" and thought it was much better, but I still want to try again. My favorite part of music is this feeling that I get that nothing's ever done and set in stone even when it's been recorded, and when you make mistakes (and I don't believe that you can make mistakes in music) you aren't causing any harm, you can just let the air calm and try again or you can rearrange those "mistakes" into another bit of music.